Archive for the ‘Sales’ Category

As you work¬†with your customer¬†remember there are two sides two a coin. I’ve found that sometimes you may be discussing the same issue but coming at it from different angles that can cause a disconnect. Make sure to understand your customer’s perspective so you can better serve them. ¬†This will not only help you in positioning and selling your product but also how you provide the best customer service possible.

Jody Sedrick
Follow me on Twitter: @jodysedrick and @zenewareinc
LinkedIn Profile  | Zenware | RoadFS
Instagram: @jodysedrick  | @roadfs | @zenwareinc
Advertisements

This episode we look at the importance of the first 30 days after the sale. ¬†This is a critical time for you to build loyalty and trust with your customers. Don’t miss this opportunity!

Episode 2: 30 Days After The Sale

Jody Sedrick
Follow me on Twitter: @jodysedrick and @zenewareinc
LinkedIn Profile  | Zenware | RoadFS
Instagram: @jodysedrick  @roadfs

Every company is on a constant quest to find and earn new business.

There is definitely an art to winning new business. To often we and our customers think of sales as the used car salesman saying “Have I got a deal for you” or “I’ve taken the time to give you an presentation, now where’s the order?”.

Sales is so much more than taking an order. Sales is about building a relationship – a relationship of trust that is more about serving the customer than serving you.

Here are 5 simple tips you can and should do to create a better opportunity for you to win a new customer at the beginning of the sales process

  1. Dress to impress – no this doesn’t mean suiting up in a tie, unless your prospects are white collar, but it does mean looking sharp. I have the opportunity to sell in both blue collar and white collar environments dress to impress for the environment and the client. ¬†Don’t over dress as the prospect may get the idea you don’t understand their business or environment. Pull up the pants, wear a company shirt and groom your hair. I’m amazed at some of the service sales “pros” that have come to my office or home who look like they just rolled out of bed and dug through the laundry pile to pull out a shirt.
  2. Speak well – this doesn’t mean you have to speak stuffy and proper. ¬†It does mean speaking professionally and with respect. Lose the “umm”, “like” ¬†and “you know”. ¬†Lose the industry jargon speak to educate. Take time to educate and where possible demonstrate your services. As they say “a picture paints a thousand words” imagine what a demo can do. ¬†And remember, you’ve interrupted the prospect’s time remember to say “Thank You”.
  3. Learn names and take notes РEveryone loves to hear their name. Work on learning names. Use their name in conversation. When visiting take notes about what they say and  even things in their office; is their favorite sports team on the wall, pictures of hunting, family or vacations. Taking notes will help you remember key things about your prospect and provide valuable information to build a relationship on your 2nd, 3rd and 50th visit.
  4. Build a relationship – Every visit work on building a relationship. ¬†Don’t force it, be genuine. People see right through phony. Initially a prospect¬†will naturally be guarded and cautious of your motive. Remember, just like you, they are¬†busy and don’t want to be sold. Come prepared, armed with information that can help them. Be considerate of their time. As you do, you will slowly earn their trust¬†and set the building blocks for a great relationship.
  5. Be consistent – Notice I said consistent not persistent. ¬†Some customers are going to take longer to win. ¬†Work to consistently be in front of them. Be respectful of their time. Don’t show up and just say “I just thought I’d stop by to say hi” – unless your bringing donuts;). ¬†Come with a purpose. Share something that will help them. ¬†If they already have a vendor a simple “I know you have a guy, but if you ever need me this is how I can help…” ¬†You never know when the current vendor can’t respond, is slammed, out of stock or a relationship sours. Be consistent and when the time comes they will know who to call.

Ultimately remember the customer. I think sometimes sales professionals forget they are serving the customer which can be¬†hard to remember when you have a pushy sales manager haunting your thoughts and driving a monthly goal. Ask your self how would I like to be sold? ¬†Putting yourself in the customer’s shoes is an interesting and rewarding exercise.¬†If you’d like to hear a great perspective¬†on how a person being sold feels as vendors solicit him for sales I invite you to listen to this great podcast and interview from the PDR College “Inside the Mind of a Nissan Dealer GM: What Do They Think of PDR”. No matter your industry software, HVAC, Property Management, Auto Reconditioning, network solutions or Appliance Repair the insight provided is invaluable.

Have additional¬†tips you’d like to share? ¬†Send them in. We’d love to share them with everyone.

Jody Sedrick
Follow me on Twitter: @jodysedrick and @zenewareinc
LinkedIn Profile  | Zenware | RoadFS
Instagram: @jodysedrick  @roadfs

 

One strike closer to a home runManaging your business or sales territory will inevitably throw you a few curveballs. Don’t get psyched. Take a breath, regroup if needed and stay in the box! Stay committed to face every pitch!

Only in the box can you conquer the game. Sure you will hit a few foul balls, a strike or two will get by. You won’t read every customer correctly or win every sale. Remember every pitch is another opportunity to HIT IT OUT OF THE PARK!

Stay in the game. Keep swinging! Your next pitch could¬†be the Grand Slam you’ve been working for.

Have a great week!
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jody Sedrick
Follow me on Twitter: @jodysedrick and @zenewareinc
LinkedIn Profile  | Zenware | RoadFS
Instagram: @jodysedrick  @roadfs

Do you find yourself shying away from price?  Are you almost apologetic discussing price with your customer?

Why¬†don’t you value the¬†price?

If you’re struggling with price then maybe it’s time to discover¬†the why of your product. Once you understand the why pricing becomes justifiable.

Forget features. What problem is your potential customer trying to solve?

structural-steelDo they need a hole? What size of hole? Where is the hole? Why do you need a hole? How many holes do you need? How fast do the holes need to be drilled?

This came very evident when I recently spent a weekend helping a friend, Read Young, who owns¬†Idaho Custom Iron Works fabricate a number of steel beams for a big project. ¬†He needed over 480¬†holes drilled into 3/8″¬†thick steel beams. ¬†As we were setting up the drill press, he said, “Hold on, let’s switch the drill bits. I purchased a set of drill bits that will cut faster and last longer. ¬†These little babies costs over $300 but they will cut your time in half.”

Read understood the value of the more expensive bits. Could a cheaper bit of delivered the hole? Absolutely, but at what costs in additional bits and more importantly in time.

Remember, get into the mindset of your customer. Understand what they are trying to accomplish. Discover what challenges they currently are working to over come. Anticipate new challenges they may encounter.  Are there limiting or prohibiting factors that your product can solve? Once you fully understand this issues discussions will center around solving problems, providing new opportunities and price will become a minor part of the discussion.

Quit apologizing. Understand your customer. Understand their environment. Understand what they are trying to do. You’ll discover that in the process, you’re not selling, your problem solving. When you reach this point the sale takes care of itself.

Ultimately if you don’t see the value of your product how do you expect the customer to do the same?

Have a great week!
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jody Sedrick
Follow me on Twitter: @jodysedrick and @zenewareinc
LinkedIn Profile  | Zenware

 

Ninja Tips to Incredible Sales and Business Success

The majority of new sales professionals make three key mistakes that cause them to either fail or stumble to earn sales and win customers. These include:

  1. Overselling
  2. Not listening
  3. Not asking questions ‚ÄĒ let‚Äôs rephrase that not asking the right questions

Over the past couple of months I’ve had the opportunity to watch and listen to variety of salespeople as they’ve come on board to our sales force. I’ve noticed a trend. The salesperson who hits the ground running and is successfully building his pipeline and even closing a few deals is the guy who spends more time listening than he does selling. For the sales novice this may seem counter intuitive but it is the key to your success.

In order to be truly succeed selling you have learn to shut the yapper and get the customer talking. The only way you can get a customer talking is to…

View original post 333 more words

Once a deal is sold and paper inked is your work done?

if you said yes, you are missing significant opportunities for future sales.

Your work is just beginning.

Case in point, one of my sales team recently signed a deal for our product RoadFS‚ĄĘ. We are in the final stages of the setup and training. ¬†This morning I asked him how the¬†final training went with the customer. ¬†He responded, “I heard it¬†went really well”. ¬†I asked, “Wouldn’t it be better for you to personally touch base and see how the training went?”

Fortunately he took the hint¬†and made the call. Two people were involved in the training. In his first call the response was more of “Thanks for checking in. We are good to go”. The second call led to a in depth discussion about previously unknown plans to grow the retail side of their business. He is now entrenched in ¬†discussions to roll out RoadFS‚ĄĘ to the mobile side of their business.

That’s right he discovered a new sale from an existing customer. Why? Because he made the effort to stay engaged with the customer. ¬†He followed up not to “touch base” rather¬†he called with a specific purpose to follow-up on the installation and training of our software.

Would the customer have called to initiate the next purchase? Probably. However, due to his continued investment in building the relationship, after the sale, the door was opened earlier to a new sale.

Remember just because¬†a customer is sold doesn’t mean you stop investing in solidifying and building the relationship with your customers.¬†A¬†customer’s experience continues after the sale. Prove that you are the trusted resource you sold yourself to be. ¬†As you get embedded with your customer you may discover the opportunity is a lot bigger than you imagined.

Have a great week!
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jody Sedrick
Follow me on Twitter: @jodysedrick and @zenewareinc
LinkedIn Profile  | Zenware